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20121027
20121104
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 24
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
you have not think that a man who has been found guilty by due process of law ought to be slightly penitant? >> if it is in fact due process. you see, jeremy, your problem is you have no idea how that system operates. and you should know something about that. >> you're the one who chose to locate his business there. >> i did, yes. >> were you just foolish or what? >> in fact, i'd say that's slightly overstating it, but i made a mistake. i underestimated the vin at and corruption of the american legal system. i cfess to that. i'm very penitant about it, too. >> what's astonishing is a man who has been through this should show no humidity and no shame. >> of course not. i've been persecuted half to death. i don't have any shame. i'm proud of having been in a u.s. federal prison and survived as well as i did. i had no problems whatsoever, not in t regime and not amongst the fellow residents. let me tell you something -- i am proud of having gone through the terribly difficu process of being falsely charged, falsely convicted and ultimately almost completely h mind, becoming irrationa
, and a vast population from which to choose trial subjects, all of whom are required under indian law to give their informed consent. >> i put my thumbprint on the document and my daughter-in-law signed in hindi, but the form was in english, so we couldn't understand everything. >> but that was enough for a 3-day-old healthy boy to be given a trial polio vaccine. he had a severe adverse event which was recorded by the hospital. four days later his family says he still has breathing and eating problems. this baby is more than one of 80 patients who the records show was severely affected in the trials in this town, most of which took place here at the main hospital. the families of the dozens who died might have never known their loved ones were ever on a trial, were it not for a doctor here at the hospital who turned whistleblower. >> the clinical trial subjects don't know the meaning of clinical trials. these doctors, they are making money and they are making huge amounts from the pharmaceutical companies. they are interested only in money. >> after he challenged his colleague he lost his job
. they passed 26 laws in hundreds of states. they have here a woman who is attacked, called a slut for wanting access to contraception and a candidate that just said, i wouldn't phrased it that way. exactly how would he have phrased it? >> that's a false narrative. >> i don't want to get off the topic of women -- okay. i will give you that time. i want to get to the impact on swing voters so-called by "the new york times" waitress moms and what is this going to do to the pitch battle in ohio, in florida, in virginia for women voters in the united states. >> we see the so-called waitress moms. we love the heart of tagging that. >> fancy that. >> these are women who typically voted for president obama in the last election cycle. but are struggling with, we are struggling economically has he upheld his promise and still don't love romney as an option either. we are seeing and talking about the women's issues, they are family issues. these are household issues. they are economic issues. access to healthcare, access to birth control. how many kids we have, those are economic issues. it's going to c
mother-in-law's from england and there's not a lot of support for her. we started talking about what happens when you get home because here she's been in emergency mode. this is one of the things we talk about, this emergency mode. she's been in emergency mode. there's the premature baby and now there's the hurricane and the adrenaline's flowing and suddenly these going to go home soon and i said sometimes what can happen is you can have some anxiety, even depression, you should expect it. i could hear her voice starting to get shaky on the phone. she said i'm starting to feel that. and so then i very gently sort of suggested you need to talk to your doctor, there are things you can do. there are steps you can take. so we ended up talking about how the follow up was so important because i think in those situations charlie she's so focused on the baby. and on the emergency. and she wasn't really paying attention to her own emotions. of course postpartum anxiety and postpartum depression can be serious. >> rose: what kind of pieces have you been doing since. i saw that parts -- parti
school of law. neil barofsky, welcome. >> thank you. >> when you were a kid, did you say, "mom, dad, i want to grow up and be an inspector general?" >> no, i said i wanted to be a lawyer, though. >> you did? >> it must be some sort of major genetic flaw i have. but my mom keeps a fortune cookie that said, "you will be a great lawyer one day." and i signed it and dated it. i think i was 12 years old. so there was something weird about me that i wanted to be a lawyer. i wanted to be a prosecutor. i mean, that was sort of what i wanted to do. maybe it's from watching tv shows, "perry mason," as a kid or something like that. but i was always drawn to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't really even know what that was until i actually got the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going to take on this job at this -- in the depth of this crisis?" >> part of it was because this
in the hostilities and therefore to kill them would be a war crime under international law, under the geneva convention. noncombatants who are summarily executed, that constitutes a war crime. it went on to say the u.n. human rights council is gathering evidence of violations carried out by both sides in syria and building a case. it seems this video, too, will be part of the evidence, if that case comes up before the international criminal court. >> if it does take it further, what does that mean? what would achieve? >> we see people from the former warsaw in yugoslavia in the international criminal court at the hague now. people are tried. the people who are subject to those violations, the victims and victims' families are allowed to say what happened to them. very severe prison sentences are handed out. at the moment we are seeing one of the purposes of the international criminal court is not just to provide justice but to show future possible violators that the there is snow impunity. this is exactly what the u.n. is threatening this morning. if you commit a violation such as what appea
his very, very first bill that he signed in to law was lily ledbetter fair pay act. it's a tremendous accomplishment. i think that shows his devotion and his commitment to women. >> first thing you have to ask is, what are women concerned about today, it's jobs, job security, opportunities for themselves and for their loved ones and in particular for their kidss there a brighter future. this is mitt romney's message to women to all americans. is that he is going to put in to place economic policies that will create growth which will create the jobs, be the energy to small businesses start growing again. >> we asked the experts whether reproductive rights is a decisive issue for women voters this year. >> it is for the barack obama campaign. they think that's the way they're going to keep their women. suggest that women would vote about who's going to pay for their contraception, that is more of an issue than are my loved ones working, am i working, are my kids going to have an opportunity when they graduate from college. >> the president especially lately, as of late, he has said, you
this summer, i looked over common- law and she might have been a 70-year-old caucasian lady next to a black lady, and they were both bobbing. was like, where do you see this? this is great. if you are a hip-hop fan, we are going to play something you like, but we are throwing some re you would not be sitting in front of. tavis: you have done some covers. >> i chose the for the gala, because she can sing anything. -- for layla because she can sing anything. i chose them because it was a perfect couple, and -- perfect cover, and i do not know many people who do that. tavis: this cp is out now. what is next in the agenda? >> i am going to do volume 2, featuring a slew of guests and artists i did not have room on this one for and people i have never worked with, so i am still getting back together -- getting back together -- that together. tavis: you are in los angeles. they are lined up all over the city. if you have just now come to know this brilliant artist, you now know the name, and you should add it to his collection. if you already know him, you are already in love with him. this projec
. these are too much. >> i hate to be cynical, but i am skeptical. they were writing the laws. good politicians act on a self interest and what the public demands. one fast point, you mentioned california, and that is where campaign finance matters. most people have a strong view about president obama or mitt romney. where this really has an impact is local but also on state emissions. california has all kinds of stuff on the balanced, because if you have got more money than your opponent, you could win. tavis: joe biden has apparently written a tell-all, and i am told it is not a flattering picture he paints of the vice president. i do not know if that would have any impact. the question is what kind of nose itches -- what kind of buzz is generated. it >> if an idealistic young american comes to washington to change things, but washington changes him. in the process of explaining his story, he takes after his former boss, joe biden, and portrays joe biden in a negative light. it is also a scathing indictment of how washington politics works and how both parties will relate to the business comm
" foundation of modern international law, which bars the threat or use of force in international affairs. there are two rogue states, the nine states and israel, which for him or which regard the charter and international law is just a boring relevance, so do what they like. and that is accepted. these are not just words. there is an ongoing war including terrorism, assassination of nuclear scientists, economic war, u.s. threats which have cut iran out of the international financial system. western military analysts identify what they call weapons of finance as acts of war, the justify violent responses when they are directed against us, that is. the united states is openly carrying out extensive cyber war against iran that is praised. the pentagon regards cyber war as equivalent to an armed attack, which justifies military response. but of course, that is when it is directed against us. the leading liberal figure in the state department, state department legal adviser, says cyber war is an act of war if it results in significant destruction. like the attacks against iranian nuclear faci
two degrees. there are out lost out against the state, but laws of physics. you begin to see the results of that when you look around events like today's. >> bill mckibben, thank you for being with us pretty quickly, how are people in vermont preparing? when hurricane irene head, it ended up not being a very big deal in new york. but it ended up being a massive catastrophe where you -- for your state, vermont. >> to lose power and have strong winds, suffers the, there were those of us in vermont that were almost psychologically, you know, we really, year later, do not need to be the center of the store. we do not wish it on anybody else, but physically and psychologically, vermont it has barely recovered from irene. with some incredible sense of sympathy for the people who are getting hammered hardest by cindy this time around. >> thank you, bill mckibben, for being with us, founder of 350.org, speaking to us from his home in vermont. when we come back, we will stay with greg jones,, scientists, a professor of environmental studies here at southern oregon university in ashlan
. then two years of law. basically i didn't really know what i wanted to do. and it seemed the right thing that my parents said as long as you study we will pay for everything. so i did this university for three years. and then i had a stint at san diego, california, which is a place that i really adore. but i guess i was looking more for a new york energy and it didn't have it. so i then went to london, 1976, to study kpun cases. i went to california to do international relations then went to london-- it was really just any excuse to be able to be kept by my parents in a way. in london i fell into photography. >> rose: how did you fall into it. >> it's a really funny story. i believe so much that things come to you. and basically i went to a friend's house for lunch and there was a foted owe of himself on his mantle piece. and i said what a great photograph. and he told me this girl studying photography here took it. i said i have always heard of this girl i would love to meet her. i went to meet her at her school. when a rifed if he school she said to me what are you doing. i said well i
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)